Review: Roxane Gay’s Hunger

I’ve started contributing to my cousin’s blog. Here’s my first post on her site!

Hi everyone! I’m a new contributor to Chronicles of a Music Journalist, as requested by my cousin. My name’s Meagan and I’ll start my debut here with a review of Roxane Gay’s Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. Gay is an author known for her sharp and insightful thoughts on feminism and pop culture, as […]

via Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body by Roxane Gay — The Misadventures of a Media Journalist

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Keeping Time

Another old assignment from my undergrad years as a creative writing major at UCF.

“Again Daddy, again,” Susie laughed as her father, Frank, finished waltzing her around their private garden. The array of flowers changed from side to side, surrounding the father and his daughter with pink and red roses, white and purple carnations, aromatic white gardenias, and orange and yellow chrysanthemums, their sweet aroma dancing around them.

“Again?” he chuckled, bestowing his beloved daughter with a tender smile. “We’ve already danced through two songs.”

“But this one is my favorite.” She giggled, clasping her hands in front of her, bending forward in urgency, pleading for another dance with her father.

“That’s what you said about the last two.” He winked at her, a mirthful glint in his eyes. He was teasing her, pretending to sit down on the gray marble bench near the garden’s arch entrance, watching as she anxiously awaited him to join her again. Of course, he would not deny his little girl another dance.

The next song began, a delicate melody being plucked lightly on an acoustic guitar. The sun floated in the sky, a brilliant, golden orb. Susie never stopped laughing and smiling, her happiness contagious. A cool summer breeze ruffled their clothes and hair, and the sun warmed them inside out. The flowers’ fragrance in the air was sweet on their lips.

“This one is my absolute favorite,” Susie chimed, tilting her head back as her father held onto her, keeping her from falling.

“This one is my favorite too.” Frank took Susie’s hand and twirled her gracefully, so content with that small, soft hand clinging to his. The music began to fade to an end just as the sun was almost finished setting, leaving a perfect line of gold on the horizon. Susie’s head nodded and Frank picked her up, bringing her inside, keeping time to the fading waltz.

Reading Challenge Accepted

I’ve spent the last two and a half years reading books for a book challenge my best friend and I decided to take on. She’s a much faster reader than I am and finished in about a year. It was the first time I’d ever done a reading challenge, as before I chose my books by whatever was at the front of my shelf and I hadn’t read yet (or wanted to reread). It only took up over 2 years, and yet, now that I no longer have that reading challenge, at the end of it, I found myself feeling a bit lost.

I looked at my bookshelf and suddenly felt overwhelmed with just how many reads I had ahead of me. How can I ever make it through that jungle? I needed a break from reading goals, if only for a day or two. Instead of trying to figure out what the next challenge would be or how to go about choosing my next read, I settled back in with a book I’ve had ongoing for as long as that last reading challenge, Leyenda. This one’s been a slow go because it’s my first time reading an entire book in Spanish. Yes, I’ve been reaching out of my comfort zones for reading for over two years only, but already I feel like I can’t go back to the way I used to choose material.

I can’t just blindly pick something up without considering what kind of writers and stories I’m supporting. Taking on that book challenge I think has made me a more conscientious reader. Like my TV-watching habits, I’ve learned to recognize what is worth my time and what should be let go.

I looked at my shelves a few days ago and thought, “What can I get rid of? What doesn’t need to be read or reread?” I still haven’t gotten around to clearing out my book case, simply because I haven’t had the time, but once my vacation comes around I’d like to dedicate a day to truly weighing my options and getting books off the shelf that really don’t need to be there. I did a mini version of this a few months ago, but then I was just trying to make space for new books I’d purchased. This time, I want to go into it with a real critical eye, so that I can continue to challenge myself with what I read.

I’m not saying I’m giving up YA or sci-fi/fantasy books completely, but I am attempting to be more aware of what I pick up off my shelf. Taking on that reading challenge for two and half years made me realize that I need to expand my horizons, so I’m including more diverse reads, whether it’s by authors of color, women, queer writers, or some combination thereof.

After three days of taking a breather with my Spanish-language book, I decided on Roxane Gay’s Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body. Books like this one are difficult but necessary if I’m going to become not only a better reader and writer, but a better person. Reading challenge accepted.

Another Post About That Anne-Girl

It took me a little over two years, but I finally finished the 26 book reading challenge! I ended the two-year endeavor with the category “a book you love, read it again,” with Anne of Green Gables. I read this book so many times between 4th and 6th grade that I lost count of how many rereads I’d gone through. For some reason though, after 12-years-old, I stopped going back to Anne’s adventures on Prince Edward Island. Maybe I felt too grown up for such childish dreams, or maybe I simply didn’t have time with all the books in the world to read. Whatever the reason, after nearly 15 years, I decided with this reading challenge it was time to go back to Avonlea.

anne blog

From the moment I opened to the first page and read the familiar lines a smile spread over my face and a warmth spread through me, like the feeling I get when I’m reunited with old friends who make me feel like I’m home. Even after 15 years, I still knew the words by heart, like my favorite song that I sing along to on the radio every time it comes on. My reintroduction to Anne Shirley at 26-years-old was as magical as that first time at 9-years-old. Just like when I was a child, I devoured the poetic language of the hopeful protagonist who chose to see the beauty around her despite having been through ugly situations her entire life. Those negative aspects of Anne’s life became more poignant to me now, especially after having watched the Netflix series Anne with an E, and I realized just how tumultuous her early years really were.

I still laughed at all the scrapes Anne got herself into, from flying off the handle at Mrs. Rachel Lynde to accidentally getting Diana drunk off wine she thought was raspberry cordial. What struck me most though, was how little I remembered of Anne’s later years, when she starts studying for the Queen’s entrance exams, goes on to win the Avery scholarship and dealing with the grief of losing Matthew. I guess I hadn’t paid much attention to “grownup” Anne when I was a kid because I just couldn’t relate to such things. Now though, reading about her anxieties with school and her ambitions, I see myself in Anne more than ever. Descriptions of how she felt being away from home, learning to cope with homesickness and eventually falling into a routine and comfort of studying, with less frequent visits home, brought back the memories of my undergrad years when I’d first graduated high school and went to college, living on my own for the first time.

The chapter of Matthew’s death struck me harder than I ever remember it from my childhood. Again, at the time, I hadn’t seen as much death as I have now, so it never hit that close to home. Having watched my friends’ and family’s loved ones pass away though over the last four years alone, Matthew Cuthbert’s death on the page hurt twice as much as it had when I was a kid reading the book. Moreover, Anne’s grieving process of delayed tears made so much more sense to me now than it did when I was a child.

I’m so glad I reread Anne of Green Gables during this particular time in my adult life. It felt like I was growing up with her all over again. Hopefully my next read won’t be so many years apart, but no matter what, I know I will always come home to Green Gables when the time is right, just like Anne.

What are your favorite childhood books and how have you felt about them when rereading as an adult?

Out of Line — Christy Leos

Sharing this poignant piece from a writer I just started following.

kneeling on the line head down a nod to fallen comrades lovers sisters brothers fathers mothers sons daughters friends defying the red white blue facade the home of the free is a lie at home huddles of angry people are quick to condemn those who want protection from the state’s brutality you are more worried […]

via Out of Line — Christy Leos