Sharing from Valprehension

I thought this was pretty nifty and wanted to share with anyone who may have an interest in crafts and stitching.

So it turns out that people are, in fact, willing to pay money for my cross-stitch pieces, which is super exciting! So far orders have been coming in a really reasonable pace for me where I don’t feel stressed out or buried in work, but I am motivated to keep stitching – it’s been pretty […]

via Crafty Update: New cross-stitches! — Valprehension

Triple Threat Reader

Gone are the days when I could settle down with one book in my lap, perhaps a snack or two and a hot beverage, and focus on one story line at a time. My attention span has been shot to death with the invention of the internet, and I freely admit that. I still enjoy reading though (obviously). How to solve the problem though of a wandering mind. Over the last couple of months I think I found the solution.

I’ve allowed myself to pick up more than one book at a time and switch between stories when I feel like one isn’t captivating my attention at a certain time, even if I really like it. The real trick though is the medium by which I consume these reads. Last month, for a lighter daily bag, I brought my Kindle with me to work and read an e-book (The Death Cure) during lunch. During the 50-minute car ride home I’d listen to my audio book (Gulliver’s Travels) as I navigated Miami traffic. And at night, when I was comfy cozy in my pajamas, ready to settle in with the lamp alight on my nightstand, I’d read a physical hardcover or paperback (Leyenda and Lord of Shadows). Some nights I still can’t concentrate on a full fledged novel though, so I compromise with comic book reading. Short pages and mostly artwork does wonders for keeping the brain entertained.

My new strategy of reading multiple books and stories through different channels at different times has also expanded the amount of reading I get done in a month. The thing about trying to keep reading one book when I wasn’t feeling it, is that I’d read the same sentence at least five times over and still not process what was happening. Letting myself give in to the new millennial attention span and spreading my reading around through e-book, audio book, and physical book has increased my ability to multitask and enjoy a story even more than I already could.

For the first time in a long time, I look forward to taking a look at my TBR list and not feeling a dreadful pit in my stomach, making me feel guilty for adding, adding, adding and never making a dent. I’ve finally started to get some of those books off my list. Should I even dare to dream that one day I can make it through the whole list? Alright, that’s probably farfetched, but a reader can dream.

A Strangely Isolated Place — stripSearchLA

In Mexico, it is an honor to be the firstborn male of the family. It is an even greater honor to bear your father’s name. It is also a good way of killing two birds with one stone: honoring an ancestor and naming your kid. This ancient practice keeps cacophonous names in rotation for longer […]

via A Strangely Isolated Place — stripSearchLA

For those lost to the cliffs

The following is a poem I wrote about an experience I had during my travels to Ireland. I’d shared a glimpse on my Instagram, but a fellow traveler whom I’d met on the trip requested to see the full poem, so here it is. Enjoy!

“For those lost to the cliffs.”

Is what the sign at the bottom of the trail read.
Yes, many a tourist stood too close to the edge
and with a gust of wind was blown over the tall
green and muddy rocks to the unforgiving waves.
Knowing this, and even in the chill gray rainy day
I set my boots to the slick brown mud, squelching
beneath my feet as every step created suction between
myself and the earth.

Up and up we trekked, staying safe behind the stone
barricade and sticking to the trail until it stopped and
opened up. We’d made it to the top…
Of the first cliff, at least, and that’s where my asthma
let me go. We walked no further, being on a time crunch
but, oh, what. A. Sight.

I ventured toward a sloped edge, my boots sliding, precarious
but I needed to see. Cold, frothy waves beat against the jagged
rocks, blue-grey over brown curtained with mossy green. My lungs
ached deliciously and the wind numbed my cheeks as I stared
down the long drop and spread my arms in praise. I breathed
in the clear air for the few short minutes we had and closed
my eyes, like praying.

The journey back down was slick, but I made it.
I made it back, but, oh, I was lost to the cliffs.

Ron Swanson Listens to Flo

This was a silly poem I wrote for our Floetry writing challenge last year, but I liked how it turned out. Enjoy!

Ron Swanson Listens to Flo

I’ve never been a man into the hippie dippy subculture of America.
I think they’re lunatics, soft and turning children into inept adults,
but what the heck, my stepdaughter asked me to listen to this
Florence and some machine she’s a part of? I don’t know.

This Florence woman, her music may not by my tastes,
but damn, can she sing. Not my usual fare, but I can
appreciate and recognize a true artist dedicated to her craft.
If my little girl is going to listen to any singer, I’d rather it be “Flo”
as she calls her, rather than those pretty boy bands who sing some
nonsense about not knowing she’s beautiful makes a girl beautiful?
Please. I’d set my good friend Leslie on them in a heartbeat if I got the chance.

Ah, now this song, this is some good subject matter.
Miss Flo, you minx, trying to butter me up with a good piece of poetry
about a wood carver. I respect that.

Yes, yes this is true. Building not just for work and not just for play.
Wow, she really gets it. I must say I’m impressed.
Coffins are a bit macabre for my taste, but I suppose someone has to build them.
Death is an inevitability; no use in denying its existence.
I dare say, I could sit and carve one of my own chairs
listening to this song all day.
Miss Flo, you’re alright.

Romance and War

I recently started thinking about the books my parents gravitate towards and found it interesting how such opposite concepts can manage to come together. My mom is an avid romance reader, which means she looks for that HEA (Happily Ever After). My dad is fascinated by stories of war, the tragedy that comes with a life of strife. Romance and war don’t belong together. And yet…

Don’t all the best war stories include tales of love? A soldier leaving behind the girl he loves, promising to come back, even though he knows that’s not a promise he should make. Two best friends on the front lines together, for better or for worse, taking on the fire for one another. A father leaving his children in the care of the mother or trusted relative, never knowing if he’ll see them again, but assuring them it will all be alright in the end. How can such a seemingly hateful event be filled with stories of love and romance?

What is it that makes that HEA worthwhile in a romance novel? Is it the rosy good times of significant others spending hours walking hand in hand and making lovely, laughing memories together? No, it’s the strife. It’s the fight. It’s the war that comes with battling to hold onto something that makes the darkness tolerable. Sometimes love and romance can be hell. I’m not talking about toxic, unhealthy relationships where all the two people ever do is hurt each other and call it love. I’m talking about the genuine mistakes made in the process of learning to share yourself with another person, and that can hurt and feel like a fight, but it’s not futile.

So, romance and war. My mom and dad. Two types that are so different and yet somehow work together to create a story that’s full of multiple HEA’s after multiple battles to learn how to get to the end of the book together.